Veolia wins Medway contract

The contract which starts in October 2010 is worth approximately £200 million. Veolia will continue to provide recycling and street cleansing services for the next seven years and waste treatment and disposal services for the next 25 years.

The agreement reflects the strong working relationship which has been developed and resulted in a doubling of recycling rates from 16% to 32% during the previous contract term. The decision was made by Medway Council as part of a push to increase recycling to 40% by the end of 2011.

For the disposal part of the contract, a new waste transfer station will be built in Whitehall Road, Strood, to allow the transfer of recyclable materials to Veolia’s material recycling facility at Rainham, Essex and to allow the transfer of waste to Veolia’s SELCHP energy recovery facility in south east London.

Medway Council’s Portfolio Holder for Front Line Services Cllr Phil Filmer said: “It is a council priority to make Medway a clean and green environment for all our residents to enjoy and our new waste contract with Veolia plays a critical part in fulfilling this commitment.

'This contract will not only make Medway more environmentally friendly, with aims to increase recycling and reduce general household waste, but will also, with the new waste transfer station, create employment in the area.

'One of our aims when considering the new waste contract was ensuring that we can provide the best possible service and value for money. We believe that all of our residents deserve a weekly waste collection and an excellent service and we are sure that this contract will fulfil this.”

Denis Gasquet, Chief Executive Officer of Veolia Environmental Services said: ‘’We are delighted to have won this contract renewal which reflects the existing high service levels provided by our staff and the quality of the partnership we have established with Medway Council. Now we are looking forward to delivering the enhanced offering that will help residents recycle more waste in line with the 40% target by the end of 2011.'